Wednesday, April 23, 2014
It begins with this obvious observation: Whales poop. In fact, they poop mightily.

The Whale Poop Hypothesis (via wnycradiolab)

Read the story. Now.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014
retrogasm:

The Golden Ratio matters…

retrogasm:

The Golden Ratio matters…

Monday, April 21, 2014
neil-gaiman:

amandapalmer:

schroedinger’s door

I will not tell you if it did or not.

neil-gaiman:

amandapalmer:

schroedinger’s door

I will not tell you if it did or not.

Sunday, April 20, 2014
fuckyeahcartography:

just—maps:

US/Canada border elevation profile [OC] [1002x860]

fuckyeahcartography:

just—maps:

US/Canada border elevation profile [OC] [1002x860]

becausebirds:

BIRD EGG BIRD EGG BIRD EGG

becausebirds:

BIRD EGG BIRD EGG BIRD EGG

Saturday, April 19, 2014
distant-traveller:

Mars near opposition

Tonight Mars is between opposition (April 8) and closest approach (April 14) looping through the constellation Virgo opposite the Sun in the night sky. That makes it prime season for telescopic views of the the Red Planet, like this one from April 3rd. The clear, sharp image was captured with a high-speed digital camera and 16-inch diameter telescope from Assis, Brazil, Planet Earth. Mars’ north polar cap is at the top left. Also visible are whitish orographic clouds - water vapor clouds condensing in the cold atmosphere above the peaks of Mars’ towering volcanos. The exact dates of closest approach and opposition are slightly different because of the planet’s elliptical orbit. Still, get your telescope out on the night of closest approach (April 14/15) and you can view both Mars and a total eclipse of the Moon. Mars will be about 1/100th the angular size of the Moon.

Image credit & copyright: Fabio Carvalho and Gabriela Carvalho

distant-traveller:

Mars near opposition

Tonight Mars is between opposition (April 8) and closest approach (April 14) looping through the constellation Virgo opposite the Sun in the night sky. That makes it prime season for telescopic views of the the Red Planet, like this one from April 3rd. The clear, sharp image was captured with a high-speed digital camera and 16-inch diameter telescope from Assis, Brazil, Planet Earth. Mars’ north polar cap is at the top left. Also visible are whitish orographic clouds - water vapor clouds condensing in the cold atmosphere above the peaks of Mars’ towering volcanos. The exact dates of closest approach and opposition are slightly different because of the planet’s elliptical orbit. Still, get your telescope out on the night of closest approach (April 14/15) and you can view both Mars and a total eclipse of the Moon. Mars will be about 1/100th the angular size of the Moon.

Image credit & copyright: Fabio Carvalho and Gabriela Carvalho

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

Friday, April 18, 2014
jennhoney:

(via xkcd: Just Alerting You)
Thursday, April 17, 2014
teded:

If you look through your glasses, binoculars or a window, you see the world on the other side. How is it that something so solid can be so invisible?
From the TED-Ed Lesson Why is glass transparent? - Mark Miodownik
Animation by Provincia Studio

teded:

If you look through your glasses, binoculars or a window, you see the world on the other side. How is it that something so solid can be so invisible?

From the TED-Ed Lesson Why is glass transparent? - Mark Miodownik

Animation by Provincia Studio

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
eddietg:

Dust in the wind.

eddietg:

Dust in the wind.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

sublim-ature:

South Island, New Zealand
Chris Wiewiora